Bikepacking, Canada

Solo

Am I there yet? I rode over 4000km, just a few hundred more to go 🙂

Riding solo has it’s ups and downs, but so does the road!

I’ve been asked so many times “solo”? Yup! On my own. I’ve been asked as a single human and as a women.

I crossed path with a handful of other cyclists and half of them are on their own. Mostly men, but women too.

It’s difficult to do it alone, but it’s also sometimes better. I ride at my own pace, sleep where I want to sleep and eat what I want to eat.

But it’s lonely. It got tough when I got on the highway, when I stopped talking to the cows and waving to the farmers. Locals would ask me questions and show interest when I was on the roads less traveled, but on the highway it’s all about the destination and how fast we can get there.

I actually met a few people that I actually shared a meal with or a cup of tea. I would also have shared beers with another, but I am an old lady and like an early bedtime 🙂

I actually got a ride yesterday, not because I was tired or hurting, no mechanical, just because I was bored and really happy to have company. A 71 year old gentleman (what an inspiration) is riding across the country with a friend driving the car and luggage and another lady friend (my age).I rode with the gentleman until he got into the support vehicle, then I got in with him. I cheated and saved 50km, but chatted, shared stories and laughed. The other lady friend is faster then he is and never gets into the support vehicle. I am so impressed of all the daily mileage she does and how strong she is.

It was great, it was awesome to have company and I am so so happy I cheated and got to get out of my head for a few hours!

Riding solo may be riskier, but not worse for a woman then a man. I know how to fix my bike, I have all the safety gear and I have loved ones following my dot on a map. Riding solo means spending more time in my head and thoughts, but also opens me to talking to others which I wouldn’t do if I was with someone else.

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Bikepacking, Canada

My great trail 5ieme partie

I stopped following “the great trail” and planned my own route as soon as the trail headed north.

I know the scenery will be flatter and the exciting trails are a thing of the past, but I am hoping to discover cool areas in the prairies while also making some progress east.

Honestly it’s a lot of fun to get on the highway and use the tailwind to do some pretty high mileage. On the other hand it is great to ride through small towns and learn more about the history of our country. I am surprised to notice a few towns with a strong french heritage. It is also great to see how some towns evolved after the minings shut down, but sad to see some become ghost towns.

Getting off the highway also means avoiding Tim Horton’s and discover great coffee shops, quirky diners and chat with locals. It get lonely to ride for hours on my own, chatting with people along the way is fun, locals usually ask questions, but also love to share the knowledge of their home town.

I detoured from my eastbound direction to explore Cypress hills provincial park. Headwind asides, going there was the best ting I could have done. I never road 100km so slow (14km/h average), making my detour longer then I wanted, but it was well worth it. This park is an Oasis, just a beautiful area with lakes and hills in the middle of flatland Canada.

If you ever spend time in Southern Alberta bring your mountain bike or fat tire gravel bike and ride the trails, it’s just an amazing area.

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Bikepacking, Canada

Au revoir Colombie Britannique

Was that the last singletrack I got to ride on this adventure? Fully loaded, heading to Alberta I enjoyed that endless mountain bike trail that made me avoid the highway for 25km.

The trail is supposed to start from Fernie, but some work clearing the forest makes it unrideable and I have to backtrack to town. Maybe Fernie doesn’t want me to leave 🙂 After 15km on the highway the trail could be picked up again and I could start smiling again!

The highway seemed to be the only way to go east from Sparwood, bit it isn’t that busy, the shoulder is wide and the views are amazing.

Now that I am in Alberta it’s time to hunt for gravel and cross my fingers for great coffee shops

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Bikepacking, Canada

Details

I am ready! Honestly I was ready a month ago!

I packed my bags and loaded my bike a few times already. I still don’t have a tire boot, but added an extra folded tire and sealant.

Tomorrow we make our way to Victoria (my partner joining for the first leg), just so I can start at mile 0 Tuesday morning to start that crazy 8000+km adventure.

My bike is so heavy I wish I could take some stuff off it, it is 49lbs fully loaded, even if I am keeping it pretty minimal.

-ultralight camping gear

-dehydrated food

-water and water treatment things

-tools and bike repair stuff

-bear scaring stuff

-essential clothing

-personal hygiène things

– important Garmin Edge and Garmin Inreach devices so I do not get lost or do get found

-solar panel and a multitude of charging cables

Sooo excited! But first I need to enjoy one last night in my bed, one last awesome espresso with my Rocket machine and one last tooth cleaning with my electric toothbrush

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Bikepacking, Canada

Ooooooh Canada!

Ça y est! Victoria jusqu’à St-John à vélo.

Après avoir roulé aux Etats-Unis, en Nouvelle-Zélande, Taiwan et plusieurs pays d’Europe, je crois qu’il est enfin temps d’explorer mon pays. Départ de Victoria prévu le 16 juin

Quelqu’un veut participer a mon aventure et parcourir quelques kilomètres de la traversée avec moi? Amateurs de gravelle recherchés 😁

Je suis ouverte aux recommendations, des idées pour éviter l’autoroute?

Finally doing it! Victoria to St-John.

After riding in The US, New Zealand, Taiwan, Europe, I think it’s time to explore my own country. Leaving Victoria June 16th, St-John ETA unknown.

Anybody want to join on some parts of the ride?

Any local knowledge, route recommendations?

Looking to limit my highway time and maximize the gravel kilometres 😁

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